Album Review: Jimmy Lee Morris – Jumping Falling Flying

Backstory

As I’ve mentioned in previous recent reviews, I’m currently working through a years-old backlog of album reviews, as I’m again finding time to write semi-regularly. This spot in my review queue had been reserved for Jimmy Lee Morris‘ 2018 release Last of the Tall Ships, which I quite enjoyed getting to know. (Personal favorites from that release were “Buying Time” and “Something About You.”) But Jimmy continues recording, so instead I’ll be taking a look at the January 2020 release, Jumping Flying Falling. Technically, it’s not the newest Jimmy Lee Morris album. That distinction would fall to his July 6th release, Distant World, on which Jimmy re-imagines songs from his early-’00s band The Collaborators. Or perhaps Jimmy Lee Morris, a sort of greatest hits collection released on July 20th. But Jumping Falling Flying remains his most recent release of new songs, so here’s a review of this latest release of new originals from a talented singer-songwriter.

Album Review of Jimmy Lee Morris: Jumping Falling Flying

Jimmy Lee Morris - Jumping Falling Flying

image courtesy of Jimmy Lee Morris

The Jimmy Lee Morris albums I’ve heard since I first reviewed his music a mere four years ago have been hooky, mellow, and pop-folky. This disc infuses a bit more rock ‘n roll than the others. It’s all very much in-style for Jimmy, not a surprising departure; in fact, there was a bit of this on Last of the Tall Ships. Jumping Falling Flying is more just a nudge toward the rockin’ end of the Jimmy Lee Morris musical canvas, and it’s always fun when a favorite artist explores his various influences. Though it was released in January, Jumping Falling Flying is an ideal collection of laid-back yet energetic, song-driven, light summer rock music. And again I mention the hooks. As soft-touch as Jimmy Lee’s music is, his discs are chock-full of hooky earworms.

Album-opener, title track “Jumping Falling Flying,” gets things started in the right, energetic direction. Old-style rock organ in support of a steady rock rhythm and occasional sunny guitar lick that amply serves as a hook, supporting a light, airy melody and vocal. Indeed, the first of many new favorites on this recording.

“All These Things” again leans on the rock guitar as a bit of a distorted light-rock backdrop framing Jimmy Lee’s emotional, memorable, insightful vocals and lyrics.

Next up, it’s sock hop time. “Rock and Roll Party” is a throwback. The sort of catchy golden oldies-style rock song made modern, as you might expect from Huey Lewis. With an opening riff straight from the Happy Days jukebox or the Hill Valley High School “Enchantment Under the Sea” dance, you’ll be twisting, watusi-ing, and getting down while listening to classic axework on this fun third track. Tune in Saturday, via time machine, to hear Dick Clark introduce this one on American Bandstand.

Time to catch your breath? Nope. “Big Shot” is a country-rock saloon number with some surf-rock guitar. Jimmy Lee Morris’ songs are versatile, maintaining a signature vibe across a wide variety of arrangements. Four songs in, and it’s becoming apparent there’s no point in trying to predict what’s next on this fun ride. Sure, the turns are smooth and comfortable, sometimes subtle, but the highway isn’t straight.

Jimmy Lee Morris

photo courtesy of Jimmy Lee Morris

“White Witch and the Highwayman” and its harmonica introduce a lively, mid-tempo Americana flavor to the record. This recalls several previous Jimmy Lee Morris songs, painting pictures and telling tales with its lyrics, an exceptionally emotive spoken-word vocal delivery steering the ship. I’m wondering if “Wilderness Wood,” a title song from an old album, might hold up well under a similar musical arrangement. I’m betting it would. But this is “White Witch and the Highwayman,” a fun frolic at song number five.

Starting the back side of the album, “Love and Lies” hints at a light Grateful Dead vibe while pleasantly, wistfully reminiscing.

“À La Tienne” and “Look up to the Sky” mark a return a Jimmy Lee Morris style more akin to that we’ve reviewed frequently here at the Blog. Mellow, emotional light folk strummers with pop influence. Pleasant, comfortable, and enjoyable.

“Not Going Back” has a little of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ jangly rock vibe to it. A mischievous glint runs through the delivery and musical arrangement. The song moves; it’s what I refer to as a traveling song. Maybe something George Thorogood would play if in a really laid-back mood, or maybe a semi-mellow Jeff Healey track from the Road House soundtrack. But nah, it’s still quintessential Jimmy Lee Morris. Yet another style of arrangement but still part of a cohesive collection.

And, finally, “It Always Rains Around Here.” A bit of a Randy Newman vibe to this toe-tapper. A pleasant song that’ll put a smile on your face, and a terrific way to close the album satisfyingly.

I must say, as a complete package, Jumping Falling Flying is a particularly interesting Jimmy Lee Morris disc. It holds together well, and the album is a journey, traveling through a variety of rock, folk, and even country influences. If you’ve dug his past work, this collection is a must-have. And if you’ve yet to sample some Jimmy Lee Morris music, this album would be a mighty fine place to start.

Looking Ahead

Well, first of all, Jimmy Lee Morris has been active. Jumping Falling Flying was only released in January, and it’s already four-deep on Jimmy Lee’s Bandcamp page, after the aforementioned greatest hits album, the reimagination of his work with The Collaborators, and and actual old album from The Collaborators. It has been a busy release schedule for Jimmy Lee Morris this year, but yes, Jumping Flying Falling remains his most recent album of new originals.

Obviously, gigs are in short supply now, but when they’re happening again, you can find Jimmy Lee’s performances at his Facebook page.

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