Album Review: Danielle M and the Glory Junkies – All My Heroes Are Ghosts

Danielle M and the Glory Junkies

photo by Caroline Alden; photo courtesy of Danielle Miraglia

Album Review of Danielle M and the Glory Junkies: All My Heroes Are Ghosts

I have referred to Danielle Miraglia’s musical style as blues-rock (when electric) or blues-folk (when acoustic), but it’s always very clearly, identifiably Danielle Miraglia. She’s one of the few Boston-area musicians who play as often as she wants without diminishing her draw. You’ve seen her reviewed frequently in this Blog, including her last album, Glory Junkies, and last summer’s annual Front Street Concerts gig (an annual concert that always sells out early).

Stylistically, there are pieces of classic rock, old-school blues, modern song-driven pop-rock, and a several additional influences in Danielle’s music. Her live covers generally include Janis Joplin, the Rolling Stones, and Prince, and for a while her standard concert-closer was a raucous rendition of Tom Waits’ “2:19.” Piece those together, add a vocal delivery style that combines power, grit, and smirk, and sprinkle in some of the Boston area’s marquee musicians (Danielle, herself, included), and an album like All My Heroes Are Ghosts is exactly what you’d expect. And while Danielle draws tremendously in metro Boston, and she fills rooms up and down the east coast on occasional tours, the one thing that’s hard to grasp is why this original, old-school, genre-crossing talent still hasn’t found a large, national audience. The cool thing about the blues, though, is that it’s a genre that will give her credit for “time served,” especially as she builds an impressive back catalog.

Danielle M and the Glory Junkies - All My Heroes Are Ghosts

image courtesy of Danielle Miraglia

All My Heroes Are Ghosts, surprisingly, is the first disc Danielle has recorded using a band name rather than as a solo artist. With an awesome band name referencing the title of the previous album, Danielle M and the Glory Junkies have performed together for quite a while, but this time the band went in as a unit and has its full name memorialized on the album cover. And, why not individually by name, in this review, as well. One of Boston’s best collections of versatile, talented musicians, top to bottom: Danielle Miraglia (guitar, vocals), Laurence Scudder (viola, vocals). Erik White (guitar, vocals), Jim Larkin (bass), and Chris Anzalone (drums). And, with the band’s increased visibility, the Danielle M and the Glory Junkies have been selected for Boston Music Award nominations in the “Blues Artist of the Year” category each of the last two years.

Now, of course, back to the disc. The album saunters into its first cut, the title track, “All My Heroes Are Ghosts,” a nostalgic track whose hits just the right laid-back rockin’ ‘n rollin’ sentimental tone.

Not one to let sentimentality sit there unprovoked, Danielle and gang follow with the rollicking “All On Fire.”

Danielle Miraglia & the Glory Junkies

photo by Geoff Wilbur

Danielle continues down the social commentary path with two tracks attacking a similar topic with different tempos. First, the toe-tapping, groovy “Monster,” with instrumental lines dancing in and out around a pulsing, driving, slow bluesy rhythm. Then rocking wailer “Everybody’s Wrong” cranks things up, though not immediately – this tune simmers slowly before even the most attentive frog realizes its boiling. It never quite reaches a rolling boil, but it’s a fun ride.

Another favorite – that makes five out of five “favorites” so far, but who’s counting? – follows with “Don’t Pray for Me,” where Danielle’s rich, gravelly vocals really drive the songs slow, steady wailing delivery.

Danielle M and the Glory Junkies

photo by Neale Eckstein; photo courtesy of Danielle Miraglia

I won’t swing song-by-song through the disc’s back nine. Er, five. But I should call out “Rock Star,” which has a Prince meets Ziggy Stardust vibe, as the band plucks its way through in support of Danielle’s plucky, funky vocals; plus it’s a song you’ll catch yourself singing whenever you see the phrase “rock star” once you’ve heard it. Oh, and “Aim Low,” just because I love the clever, hilarious lyrics delivered with Danielle’s trademark mischievous half-smile/half-snark, beloved by fans and reserved for songs like this, on what could easily have been Homer Simpsons’ personal theme song. Oh, geez, and of course her delivery is spot on during the band’s rendition of Janis Joplin’s “What Good Can Drinkin Do,” during which the bands rhythmic musical tour de force backs Danielle’s bluesy rockin’, growling blues (can I say “bluesy” again?) vocal. OK, that’s three of the last five mentioned. I’m sure Danielle could write a great song about how badly I achieved my mission of skimming the back five.

But hey, Danielle Miraglia’s albums just keep getting better. Even though it doesn’t seem possible. I’m almost afraid of what comes next.

Danielle M and the Glory Junkies at the Spire Center

photo by Denise Maccaferri; photo courtesy of Danielle Miraglia

Looking Ahead

What comes next for Danielle Miraglia is a new record. She’s currently working on a solo acoustic folk/blues album, whose release has been bumped back from this spring to fall 2020 by the less-than-conducive-to-tour-support conditions we’re going through right now. That as-yet-unnamed album is available for pre-order here, and it will feature a combination of acoustic folk/blues covers and acoustic versions of DMiraglia originals. Also, until it’s possible to begin touring again, Danielle performs occasional live streaming concerts. The most recent one was May 15th, but you can stay current here on this social distancing-based page on her website or, likely, on the events tab of her Facebook page.

As for live performances, the “Shows” tab on Danielle’s website still lists a May 28 Bob Dylan birthday tribute event in Portland, ME, but a clickthrough to get tickets shows a May 19, 2021 performance date, and the St. Lawrence Arts venue calendar doesn’t list the show, so I’d assume that gig is likely going to be a casualty of COVID-19. The other date listed on Danielle’s “Shows” tab is a Friday, October 9th show at the Second Friday Coffeehouse in Belmont, MA. Let’s hope that happens. It looks like the event site doesn’t currently have a show listing, since it’s closed until the situation changes. Danielle’s Facebook page also lists shows currently scheduled for December 12, 2020 and April 17, 2021. She’s a road warrior, so I’m sure she’ll be gigging everywhere when it’s safe to perform live again. In the meantime, though, be sure to check out this album, past discs, her upcoming release, and, of course, Danielle’s live streams.

Looking ahead for the Blog? Hopefully, this will be the start of something again. I began writing this review back in November 2018, and I just found time to finish it this past week. It’s the first album review I wrote personally that I’ve published since November 2018, when my review of Persona’s Metamorphosis hit the blog. (I’ve managed a few live reviews since.) I currently I have countless reviews still “in the queue” – exceptional recordings from some of my favorite, talented artists – so assuming I’m able to write regularly again now, look for more long-overdue reviews of albums you’re going to enjoy discovering in the coming weeks and months. But this review is a good place to start. Danielle M and the Glory Junkies’ All My Heroes Are Ghosts, if it doesn’t already grace your collection, will quickly become a rockin’ blues favorite.

Album Review: Dan Israel – Social Media Anxiety Disorder

Dan Israel

photo by Steven Cohen; photo courtesy of Dan Israel

by Eric Harabadian, Contributing Blogger

Album Review of Dan Israel: Social Media Anxiety Disorder

Believe it or not, Social Media Anxiety Disorder is the 15th release for this Minneapolis-based singer-songwriter. Heck, there are many major label artists that can’t claim that accomplishment! So, what’s the prodigious Minnesota troubadour been up to? Well, hot on the heels of his 2018 record You’re Free, Dan Israel climbs out of his songwriting comfort zone a little bit in favor of some clever production manipulation and playful arranging. He worked with two different producers in Jon Herchert and Steve Price, resulting in a cross-pollination of inventive ideas.

Dan Israel - Social Media Anxiety Disorder album cover

image courtesy of Dan Israel

Israel kicks things off with the horn-driven pop/rock of “Be My Girl.” It’s a strong single, with terrific airplay potential. The uptempo spark of the rhythms are complemented by Israel’s emotive Elvis Costello-like twang and a good time feel.

“125” shifts gears entirely placing the listener in a pseudo-psychedelic state. The dreamy flowing lead vocals and fuzzed out lead guitar are stellar. “Just Can’t Take It” features little quirky production ear candy bolstered by a catchy chorus and lush bridge. “Still I’m Lost” returns to that semi-psychedelic spacey kind of vibe. It’s a nice blend of thoughtful experimentation and melodic pop. It sounds like something Bowie would do.

“Might As Well Be Me” features a country-folk element. It is the closest to pure Americana you’ll probably find here. There is some tasty acoustic guitar soloing, and Israel’s vocals kind of remind me of something by John Sebastian.

Dan Israel - Social Media Anxiety Disorder album back cover

back cover; image courtesy of Dan Israel

“Another Day” is more catchy upbeat pop that this artist is known for. The slide guitar breaks here are very nice as well.

“Just Can’t Take It (Revisited)” is kind of a vocal reprise montage. Through musical snippets from the original track and spoken word, Israel slyly comments on the impinging stresses of modern society and the expectations of those involved in social media. It’s a mind-bender, for sure.

“Tired” prominently features organ and has an overall gloss similar to The Wallflowers and Crowded House. “Alright” follows and ushers in a kind of rockabilly swing. Its upbeat and bouncy groove is infectious. “Here for Today” has a simple and pragmatic message toward life of “trying to take a little and leave a little behind.” The dense guitar work here really rocks and provides a wall of sound.

Dan Israel

photo by Steven Cohen; photo courtesy of Dan Israel

The concluding two tracks “Out of My Hands” and “Out of My Hands” (Reprise)” sort of combines the spirit of the Rolling Stones album Exile on Main Street with a gospel touch. It’s a fitting way to wrap up the festivities and sends a poignant and pensive message of acceptance and soldiering on.

They say music is a healer and Dan Israel brings to light songs that can address serious topics of personal challenges and societal anxiety and present them in an entertaining and uplifting fashion.

Looking Ahead

Per the “Shows” tab on Dan’s website, he has a packed schedule of performances ahead. Currently lots of gigs in and around Minneapolis, some shows in northern Minnesota, and a January 31/February 1 house concert in Wilmington, North Carolina. So keep an eye on his website for performances in your area.

[Publisher’s Note: Geoff Wilbur’s Music Blog has reviewed each of Dan’s last three releases. I reviewed Dan’s album Dan. James Morris reviewed You’re Free. And now Eric Harabadian has reviewed Social Media Anxiety Disorder. – GW]

EP Review: Hobo Chang – Clockwork Monster

Hobo Chang

photo by Rob Watts; photo courtesy of Hobo Chang

by James Morris, Contributing Blogger

EP Review of Hobo Chang: Clockwork Monster

Hobo Chang, a band from North East Essex in the UK, are releasing a new EP on the 29th November. When I reviewed their previous album, Beast in 2017, I summed it up as a “hypnotic and swirling sonic landscape with a vaguely disturbing mood.”

This new EP continues in the same vein. Apocalyptic, bedsit rock with a heavy dark melancholy hanging over it, like a psychedelic, indie shroud.

Hobo Chang - Clockwork Monster

image courtesy of Hobo Chang

The songs, “Clockwork Monster,” “Nightcrawler,” “Borrowed Time,” and “Where is Your God Now,” are four tracks of intense, moody prog rock in the trademark style you would expect from the band.

No one song stands taller than another, instead they all co-exist, increasing in their dark mass, like the gravitational pull of a black hole.

If you are a fan of Hobo Chang and the music they produce then you will be extremely happy to once again be immersed in the darkness of this new music which carries all their signature, experimental, musical hallmarks.

Keep up to date with the band on social media or on their website: Facebook @hobochang; www.hobochang.co.uk; hobochang.bandcamp.com

Album Review: Norwood – Lizzy White Doesn’t Give a Fuck

Norwood band photo

photo courtesy of Norwood

by James Morris, Contributing Blogger

Album Review of Norwood: Lizzy White Doesn’t Give a Fuck

Norwood album cover

image courtesy of Norwood

Norwood’s new album, Lizzy White Doesn’t Give A Fuck, is the follow up to their 2016 album Notes to My Blood. It finds the band once again presenting fast, wordy, personally observational and quirky songs. If you haven’t heard them before and need a reference, then think indie REM meets They Might Be Giants.

Enjoyably put together with an underlying acoustic vibe enhanced by appropriately layered instrumentation. Whether it’s the violin that bows its way throughout the album or the brass on songs like “Against the Grain,” it all adds to the uplifting, unique, joyous feel of the album.

Norwood band photo

photo courtesy of Norwood

Don’t be fooled, though. On the surface it all sounds upbeat and fun, and this bright and breezy feel could easily be more than enough reason to enjoy the album. But listen harder and you can dig down to discover more of what is going on in the twisting and turning of the lyrics. The songs’ themes are refreshingly original and dripping with enough enigmatic quandary to make you really think, which is very appealing and rewarding in an often trite and cliched musical world.

Norwood band photo

photo courtesy of Norwood

If this album is your starting point for this band, then it is a great one for starters, but I would also recommend you go and discover their previous album, Notes to my Blood, as the two complement each other like cheeky, wry, indie, musical bookends.

The band have a gig coming up in Bellmore, NY on November 5th at KJ Farrell’s Bar and Grill, 242 Pettit Ave., from 7:30pm. You can find this information on the “Upcoming Shows” page of the band’s website.

Engage with the band on social media: https://www.facebook.com/norwoodtunes/.

Album Review: Simon Scardanelli – The Rock, the Sea, the Rising Tide

by James Morris, Contributing Blogger

Album Review of Simon Scardanelli: The Rock, the Sea, the Rising Tide

Simon Scardanelli has a new album release on September 6th. The Rock, the Sea, the Rising Tide is a mature and contemplative listen. Simon takes on the mantle of the balladeer, a storytelling troubadour, regaling us with intriguing tales of high seas and adventure, darkness and human frailty, global catastrophe and personal doubt.

This is a carefully considered body of work. Acoustically styled, guitar picked songs with a sparse balance of additional instruments. The occasional use of violin, cello, recorders, and cumbus, round out each song perfectly.

There is a dark theme of human fragility through the album; it’s like a bleak but majestic windswept moor, or like standing on a wild cliff edge gazing over a brooding misty sea. You listen with suspense, transported by the haunting stories within each song. The narrative of his songs is something Simon has always taken great care with, and the poetry, imagination, and imagery that shines through this album shows how much enjoyment he had in writing them.

The album opens with “The Ballad of Jago Trelawney,” the story of a Cornish tin miner summoned into navy service for his country, which ends in a tragic sea battle. Based around a fictional character, the events it describes are from an actual battle that took place in 1793 between the ships English Nymph and the French Cleopatra. It’s from the chorus of this song that the album takes its name.

The album is full of imagined and real-life experiences that Simon has woven into an intriguing and rewarding musical landscape. The perils and mysteries of the ocean continue in the unfolding tales “The Cold Green Sea” and “Pearly Diving Sea,” leading to the only instrumental in this collection. “Becalmed” provides a moment to reflect before the wind once again whips us on to the lightly picked and beautifully haunting “Different.”

The next track is the most personal and introspective song on the album. “Patience” steps away, for a moment, from the more enigmatic storytelling and provides a more direct insight into the writer’s own creative world and, dare I say, insecurities.

Next up is “Human Nature – the Cry.” “Human Nature” was the first single from the album and is a clear warning of the climate change disaster that threatens the planet we live on and the arrogant disregard a particular world leader pays to the threat. It’s a spartan and compelling listen. Complexity disguised with chameleon simplicity with a depth of thought behind every carefully chosen word and guitar phrase.

More human vulnerability and oracular observation are brought forth in “A Simple Case of Time” and “Star City,” which has quirkier feel but remains moodily within the album’s sense of positive desolation.

Before we reach the album’s conclusion, Simon sings touchingly and illustratively on “Requiem for the City of New York,” which is a reflective backward glance at a city he once lived in.

Finally, there is an alternate version of “Human Nature – the Lament.” It is less strident and angry than the single version. It’s sadder and more resigned, and this presents the song in a very different light, which provides a fitting end to this thought-provoking album.

Once again Simon has produced an album uncompromisingly his own. Different from all that has come before and no doubt from what he will do next. This is no fashion-following attempt to please anyone but himself. As he sings in the song “Patience,” “Jumping on a bandwagon seems to be the next big thing.” Never so for Simon Scardanelli, and in following his heart, he has made an album of bleak majesty which pulls its listener deep under crashing waves to the ethereal realm that lies beneath their cacophony. A place of quiet solemnity, where you have space to ponder and unravel these modern folk chronicles as they are spun out before you in sparse but richly delivered song.

You can read more of what Simon had to say about his new album in a recent interview I did with him here.

Keep up-to-date with his news and live shows through his website www.scardanelli.com or on social media: Twitter: @scardo; Facebook: @SimonScardanelliMusic.

Interview with Carmine Appice and Album Review: Camine Appice – Guitar Zeus

photo courtesy of Anne Leighton Media

by Eric Harabadian, Contributing Blogger

Interview with Carmine Appice interspersed with Album Review of Carmine Appice: Guitar Zeus

Carmine Appice is a true living rock and roll legend. His credentials are practically unparalleled when it comes to accomplishments in modern music. He’s a drummer, vocalist, songwriter, author, educator, storyteller and, overall, raconteur who has done it all. Beginning his professional career in the ‘60s with Vanilla Fudge, Appice created the template for contemporary rock as we know it. Predating and paving the way for Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, and a number of guitar and theatrically-based bands, Appice almost single-handedly forged the genre known as “stoner rock.” The drummer-vocalist was also a founding member of the bands Cactus and worked with Jeff Beck and VF bassist Tim Bogert in Beck, Bogert & Appice. Perhaps one of Appice’s most commercially significant musical stints was as a member of Rod Stewart’s band. It was there that he also wrote one of Rod’s biggest hits to date, “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy,” and the follow up “Young Turks.” During the ‘80s, Appice worked with Ozzy Osbourne, Ted Nugent, Edgar Winter and led his own groups King Kobra and Blue Murder.

image courtesy of Anne Leighton Media

Currently, Appice is on the promotion trail discussing the re-release of a major recording project he began in the mid-‘90s called Guitar Zeus. In it, the drummer/producer brought together some of the finest guitarists of all time to collaborate on a multiple original song project that brought various genres of hard rock to the forefront.

“Actually, this idea started in ’95 and ’97 when I was working in a band called Mother’s Army with Joe Lynn Turner and Bob Daisley,” explains Appice. “I was doing searches for band names because it had been ten years since I did a solo album and I wanted to do something new.”

It took Appice a couple years to get a record deal for his new project, but, as fate would have it, he did a clinic at a music store with guitarist Brian May. At that time Appice came up with the concept of guest guitarists from various genres appearing on his solo album, so May ended up being the first artist he asked. Ted Nugent was also invited as well as the members of Kings X and many other artists.

“I finally got this deal out of Japan and I recorded it,” says Appice. “I did two records, and it cost me $100,000. I paid everyone who played on it the going rate and Guitar Zeus was released in Europe and Asia. It sold over 150,000 records worldwide. It was finally released in the U.S. in 2005 with a European label that eventually went out of business. I decided I wanted to re-release these albums because everybody that’s on it is big again.”

And there is a virtual who’s who of rock guitar on Guitar Zeus. The list will surely make any serious music and guitar fan salivate profusely. On-board are Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, Richie Sambora, Steve Morse, Brian May, Ted Nugent, Slash, Neal Schon, Yngwie Malmsteen, dUg Pinnick, Pat Travers, Vivian Campbell, Jennifer Batten, Warren DeMartini, Elliot Easton, Bruce Kulick, Dweezil Zappa, Paul Gilbert, Leslie West, and many others.

“Of course, Brian May is huge now with all the movie stuff as well as Neal Schon with Journey,” says Appice. “But back in the ‘90s, grunge was big, and we were all dinosaurs. I spent most of the ‘90s working in Japan because a lot of folks didn’t wanna hear from guys of the ‘60s, ‘70s, and even ‘80s. I also had a bunch of tracks that never really made it to the American version of this project.”

Brian May and Carmine Appice; photo courtesy of Anne Leighton Media

Guitar Zeus features over 30 original tracks all digitally re-mastered by Stephen DeAcutis and executive produced by Carmine Appice himself. The core band on each track consists of all stars Tony Franklin on bass; Kelly Keeling on vocals, keys, and rhythm guitar; and, of course, Appice on drums. Highlights of some of the tunes include Brian May’s wah-wah guitarwork on “Nobody Knew,” Steve Morse’s dark proggy Jeff Beck-like licks on “4 Miles High,” Ted Nugent’s inspired feedback-drenched fretwork on “Days Are Nights,” Pat Travers’ re-make of “Do You Think I’m Sexy,” and many other performances too numerous to mention. It’s a very special digital release that will be available on all platforms along with special vinyl and CD editions.

“A lot of people will finally get to hear this that never heard it before,” says Appice. “There is a Soundgarden meets Blue Murder kind of vibe with the tunes that has a lot of guitar playing and jamming like the ‘70s. Each song has its own tuning and is unique. And there is a lot of ear candy on here where the mix moves the music around the speakers like in the days of The Beatles’ Revolver or Sgt. Pepper where sounds would move from left to right in your head.”

For all the information on Guitar Zeus and Carmine Appice, just go to www.guitarzeus.net and www.carmineappice.net.

This Weekend

On Saturday, March 30th, Appice will be teaching a Drum Master Class at the Trilogy Lounge in Seymour, CT. On June 29th, he’ll be performing as a member of Vanilla Fudge at the Boulton Center in Bay Shore, NY. Watch Carmine Appice’s website for additional dates, and be sure the double-check with the venue to confirm.

Album Review: Tosha Owens – Wrong Side of Right

Tosha Owens - Wrong Side of Right

image courtesy of Tosha Owens

by Eric Harabadian, Contributing Blogger

Album Review of Tosha Owens: Wrong Side of Right

Multiple award-winning singer-songwriter Tosha Owens hits it out of the park with this latest blues and soul drenched venture. Owens has been a consistent fixture on the Detroit music scene since the ‘80s, and this album proves she is not one to rest on her laurels. She and guitarist/producer/co-writer Brett Lucas are a great team that has crafted a dynamic set of songs that are sure to resonate.

Tosha Owens

photo courtesy of Tosha Owens

“You Ain’t Right” opens the album with a minor mid-tempo blues burner about a one-sided relationship. From the get-go, you know Owens is gonna give it to you straight. The title track “Wrong Side of Right” follows and picks up the pace, with some light funk as the singer talks about choices and those gray areas in between. “I’ll Just Say It” is a great ballad in the vein of Al Green. This features a smooth jazz touch from John Douglas on flugelhorn. Somewhat of a surprise is a deep cut from the Janis Joplin songbook called “Half Moon.” There are some great horns here along with Lucas’ funky guitar and a standout performance from Owens. Another highlight is the first-person account of one’s need to “pay it forward” in helping those less fortunate, with the very soulful “Cold in Detroit Tonight.” Pianist Evan Mercer kills on the Ray Charles ballad “Ain’t That Love.” It’s a fitting and sweet way to put a beautiful bow on this stellar dozen of superb modern and classic soul and blues-rock gems.

Live Performances

The “Shows” page of Tosha’s website lists her 2018 shows. Keep an eye on that page as she adds 2019 performances.