EP Review: Lisa Bastoni – Backyard Birds

Lisa Bastoni – Backyard Birds

image courtesy of Lisa Bastoni

by Eric Harabadian, Contributing Blogger

EP Review of Lisa Bastoni: Backyard Birds

Lisa Bastoni an accomplished songstress from Northampton, Massachusetts that has earned award consideration and wowed audiences and major Folk/Americana events like the Boston Music Awards (folk category) and Kerrville. Her sweet, expressive voice recalls artists like Gretchen Peters and Patty Griffin. It’s a modern, poetic style that speaks from the heart and personal experience. And her delivery is so billowy and comforting, as to lull one into almost a meditative state. Bastoni has two previous albums to her credit, The Wishing Hour and How We Want to LiveBackyard Birds was recorded at home during the lockdown of 2020. It’s a low key release, in that it simply features Bastoni and producer/multi-instrumentalist/harmony vocalist Sean Staples. The production is minimal, but therein lies its power. The simplicity totally serves the music and message.

“Bring it On” is a wise song that rings true for anyone that has a history between themselves and a partner. It’s about cleaning one’s own emotional closet and honestly observing truth in how you feel toward someone. Bastoni in the chorus sings: “There’s a whole lot of things you’ve been carrying too long. If you want to love me, if you feel that strong, bring it on.”

“Southern Belle” has an early Linda Ronstadt/Emmylou Harris feel. There’s nice Dobro guitar work here by Tim Kelly. The storyline centers on a woman that doesn’t wanna rush things in a relationship. She’s all about biding her time and waiting for love to take hold. The protagonist sings: “When you want to come around, I’ll meet you at the station. I’m not going to force your hand. I love you but I’m patient.”

Lisa Bastoni

photo courtesy of Lisa Bastoni

“Sorrow’s a String” is about changes one goes through in their personal life. Memories and a love for someone — in this case, her grandparents — forever endures, even though the people may not physically be present anymore. “When I cry my sorrow’s a string,” sings Bastoni. “I want to love you as long as I can. I would fly if I had wings. How I wish I could see you again.” And here she recalls fond moments in her grandparents’ house: “I can still hear your footsteps running down the stairway, I can still see your smile as you open the door. A new radio tower has gone up in the distance, but the backyard birds still whistle your songs.”

“If Not Today” features sleek acoustic guitar work from Staples. It’s got kind of a folk/blues vibe. The chorus encapsulates the urgency of the tune, with: “You can be a wallflower when the dancing starts, be a February empty of little paper hearts. A new morning’s coming and you’re right back where you’ve been. If not today, then when?”

“Red Rocks” has a relaxed country feel that documents an account of a burgeoning, yet fleeting love affair. In it, Bastoni unpacks heavy emotions : “I carried deep the promises of something just begun, felt it burn inside me like the high desert sun. You made me feel like I could be, a way I’d never been. Maybe someday I will go back there again.” And the chorus pulls no punches: “We had Red Rocks, blue skies, turquoise and tiger’s eye. We had young love, wild as a desert rose. Young love comes and goes.”

“Hidden in the Song” is another piece that seems to deal with speaking plainly and stating true feelings. Bastoni sets the scene in this verse: “At the party in the backyard you were soaking up the stars. Did you stand so close together or did you stand apart? Did you look her in the eye, did you find the words to say, or did you send a message in every note that you played?” The chorus states: “Simple words, but you can’t hide the meaning, hidden in the song that you were singing.”

The final song on the EP is called “This is My Love.” This is Bastoni in her purest form, so to speak. It’s just her and solo acoustic guitar recorded in her kitchen on a cell phone. It’s a basic, yet thought-provoking song of unfettered admiration for her significant other. She sings: “There’s a tugging at my shoes on this road I walk to you. Runs as far as a dream can dream. I’ve been asking without words, I wonder if you heard, I wonder if you ever think of me?”

On this sublime and unpretentious collection of original stories and songs, Bastoni is not afraid to be vulnerable and transparent. This new release features the artist at her most lyrical and melodically astute.

Looking Ahead

Available digitally via Lisa’s Bandcamp website since May 20th, the official release date for Backyard Birds is Friday, June 25th, with a release party to be held on Saturday, June 26th at the iconic Club Passim in Cambridge, MA. Other upcoming shows on Lisa’s calendar, which you can find at her website, are Friday, July 9th with Cloudbelly at the Northampton Summer Park Series in Northampton, MA; Sunday, July 18th with Danielle Miraglia on the Burren Back Patio in Somerville, MA; and Saturday, August 28th with Naomi Summers at the St. John’s 3rd Annual Bluegrass Fest in North Guilford, CT. Check out Lisa’s website for more information and keep an eye out for addition dates as they’re added.

Album Review: Lisa Bastoni – How We Want to Live

Lisa Bastoni

photo courtesy of Lisa Bastoni

Album Review of Lisa Bastoni: How We Want to Live

Lisa Bastoni is well-known around New England as one of the region’s premier folk singer-songwriters. Naturally, awareness of her talent extends beyond the region’s boundaries, but we’re lucky to get to enjoy more of her performances than the rest of you. (Well, obviously not lately, but generally that’s true.) As such, it’s my pleasure to be able to share Lisa’s talents with you, to highlight them within the context of this album review.

Lisa is pretty straightforwardly folk, but you can tell she has plenty of other influences, which help give Lisa’s music the texture that allows them stand out from the crowd. (You know, the influences, plus her hard work and talent.) There’s a bit of blues in there, when necessary. Some old-fashioned country. A bit of bluegrass. And, even moreso when the song really calls for it, Lisa is able to tap into a rough-edged, hoarse vocal delivery that conveys earnestness and emotion.

Lisa Bastoni – How We Want to Live

image courtesy of Lisa Bastoni

Album-opener “Nearby” displays several of Lisa’s strengths. In the chorus of this catchy singer-songwriter fare, Lisa examines the past, dishing out life lessons as the song rises and falls, with emotion clearly driving her almost matter-of-fact, still somewhat wry delivery: “I was wasting time in all the wrong places. Sifting through a river of faces. I was busy looking at the stars in the sky. You were so nearby.”

Title track “How We Want to Live” adds a bit more twang and a steady pace, equal parts melancholy regret and thoughtful forethought. This song is driven largely by the appeal of Lisa’s voice and the delivery she has perfected to best suit it. It pulls the listener in, very clearly on this song and this album, likely even more in a live performance.

There are more soft spots in the vocals, portraying vulnerability, in “Silver Line.” This song has well-placed dips in its engaging rhythm and, at least after several listens, an overwhelming urge to sing along with “loving you is like falling down a silver line” before Lisa picks up the lyrical pace enough that it’ll take a lot more than the couple dozen listens I’ve given this album before I’m able to sing it with her.

There are life lessons – or, at least, a generalization of lessons learned and lessons observed – throughout this disc.  There’s kind of a nice trilogy mid-album. First, the tumultuous “Never Gone to You.” Then the ideal parent-daughter song of love, “Beautiful Girl.” And finally the uplifting recollections of “Take the Wheel”: “You could make me cry or make me laugh like an old love letter or a photograph. I needed you to take the wheel. Saying I love you isn’t even close to what I feel.”

Things get simultaneously jazzier and bluesier during the quirkily compelling, slow-moving “Dogs of New Orleans.” But then the pace picks up again with the cheerful, fiddle-driven ditty “Walk a Little Closer,” featuring the singalong-able: “It doesn’t make sense my dear. I just want to stay right here. Let me walk a little closer, closer to you.”

The penultimate track on the album is its sole cover, Lisa’s rendition of Bob Dylan’s “Workingman’s Blues #2.” Lisa digs out her grittiest, most heartfelt, moderately downtrodden vocal for the song’s verses, bringing the volume up just a hint to add the requisite vocal heft to the chorus.

The album closes with “Pocketful of Sighs,” a song that tells a complicated emotional picture, much like the entire album, introspective, recollective, and forward-looking all at once.

The album is so solid throughout that I have a hard time calling out favorites. Mine shift with each listen. It’s just a really strong listen beginning-to-end, and it showcases all of the elements that suggest Lisa’s performances would be a special treat, especially in a cozy coffeeshop, but also suggesting that her raspy, intimate vocals could make a large theater feel like a living room, as well. She’s one of Boston’s best folk-based singer-songwriters, and How We Want to Live lives up to those lofty expectations.

Looking Ahead

The very top of Lisa’s website is where the tour dates would be listed if there were any right now. (Hopefully soon.) The “Events” tab of Lisa’s Facebook page actually does list an upcoming show: Saturday, April 2, 2022, at the First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church in Duxbury MA, with Danielle Miraglia and Monica Rizzio. Assuming that date stands a year from now, it’ll be a barnburner of a show.

Lisa has another album planned for release later this year. Watch for it. Here’s hoping it arrives on schedule!